Roasted Root Veggies

This a classic common sense recipe. By that I mean, there really isn’t a recipe and you should probably learn this and add it to your portfolio of skills. It’s easy, delicious and can be adjusted to match many meals.

It’s perfect for daily dinners or if you splurge on some multi-colored carrots it can be fancy enough for gatherings and holiday dinners. I love drizzling this with some balsamic glaze or throwing a handful of leftover veggies on a salad the next day for lunch.

I’ve included rough ingredient estimates because I don’t think I’ve ever measured them.


  • Ingredients:
    • 4ish cups root veggies: carrots, sweet potatoes, red, yellow, purple potatoes, etc.
    • 2-4 tbsp olive oil
    • salt
    • pepper
  • Directions:
    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. Chop your veggies into 1-2 inch cubes/chunks.
      • Note: The smaller you cut, the faster they cook. If I’m in a big hurry, I chop them tiny to cut the cooking time down as much as possible.
    3. Toss the veggies with the olive oil, salt, pepper, and any additional spices you want.
    4. Spread them out on a lined baking sheet and bake 25-35 minutes,
      • Note: You’re looking for the insides to be soft when poked with a fork and outsides that are slightly shriveled/crisped.
  • Alternate variations:
    • mix it up with some different combos.
      • garlic powder and smoked paprika
      • rosemary and basil
      • apples and onion
      • lemon pepper and chives
      • cayenne and chili powder
      • add some sausage straight to the pan and make it a full pan dinner
      • the variations are endless, go crazy with them!

 

Prost! Mahlzeit!
Esther

Basic Quiche

Bonjour, ma cher!

This is how my grandmother almost always begins a voicemail. Just imagine it spoken in a way where “bonjour” is “bonjouuuuuuuuur” and “ma cher” has a long “eeeee” sound on the end of it and the woman saying it is wearing cashmere and hot pink lipstick. It’s quirky and adorable and *so* Patricia. She loves everything French: French food, French fashion, French interior design. All of it. She firmly believes she can speak French and moved to Paris for a year to study at the Sorbonne when she was 70.

My grandmother loved to cook anything and everything that had way too many steps. If a recipe didn’t have many steps, she’d add some. But her food was always delicious. (I’m speaking in past tense because she just doesn’t cook anymore, which is really a tragedy.)

This quiche recipe is an homage to her, since she is Very Picky About Quiche. And quiche is, well, very French. We made this very often growing up and my mom developed this recipe. It’s where I started getting really into making pie crust. I’ll give you the basic recipe here with some of my favorite add-ins, but you can really add anything you want.

Ingredients:

  • 6 eggs
  • 1 C milk
  • handful of grated parmesan
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • 3 patties of breakfast sausage OR  handful of bulk sausage
  • 1/2 of 1 leek, finely sliced
  • grated cheddar cheese, about 1 C

Pie Crust:

  • 1 C flour
  • heaping 1/3 C shortening
  • 1 tsp salt
  • very cold/ice water

Preheat the oven to 350.

Filling:

Mix the eggs, milk, parmesan, salt, and pepper together in a large bowl. Set aside.

Brown the sausage until it’s crispy. Make sure you chop it up in the pan into at least bit-sized pieces, if not smaller. Scrape into a bowl lined with paper towel to absorb some of the drippings.

Slice the leek thinly – leeks are most beautiful this way, as they end up as a beautiful transparent circle of light green. NB: make sure you wash them thoroughly and peel some of the top layers off, as dirt inevitable gets really jammed in there and no one wants that kind of crunch in their quiche. Set aside.

Crust:

In a large bowl combine the flour, shortening, and salt. Combine them using a pastry tool or a fork until it resembles a really course kinda chunky flour. SLOWLY add in a TINY bit of cold water and keep mixing. You want to add *just* enough cold water that the dough starts to form a ball. Once it’s at that stage, STOP with the water and use your hands.

Work the dough quickly into a ball. Place it on a well-floured countertop and start rolling it out. Personally, I love the rolling pins that are just one giant stick that gradually taper at the ends, so you never end up with lines in your dough from the edge of the rolling pin. If you’re in a jam and you don’t have a rolling pin, a bottle of wine works fairly well. If it’s chilled wine, though, best of luck. Make sure you flour the rolling pin/wine bottle, so it doesn’t stick to your dough. As I roll mine out, I flip the circle of dough so that both sides are well-floured and so that it doesn’t stick to the countertop. Once it’s rolled out to where it’s about 1/8″ thick, fold it into quarters.

Place the dough into your pie dish and unfold it. Smooth out any creases & fill any holes. Roll the edge of the dough under itself along the edge of your pie dish and crimp it/decorate it in anyway that really gets you going.

Fill the pie shell with the sausage and leeks then pour the egg mixture over it. Sprinkle the top with cheddar cheese and ever so gently place it in the oven. Bake it until it smells like breakfast and the middle of the quiche has stopped jiggling. Usually the cheese also gets a little brown and crispy on top, which is just delightful.

Serves: *technically* 6, but, like, who doesn’t want an entire quarter of a quiche?

NB: a word of warning before adding tomatoes into quiche – make sure they’re deseeded and roasted otherwise the water content in them will ruin the texture of your quiche. The same goes for spinach, except please don’t roast spinach. Just cook it down and drain it and squeeze it with paper towel or cheesecloth.

Bon appetite and egészségedre!

Hannah

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Spoicy Italian Sausage + Orzo

The other day as I was perusing Instagram stories for the 592,094,701-th time that day, one of my fave mom ‘grammers posted about her healthy lunch with orzo and greens and I don’t even remember what else. It looked amazing, but she kept apologizing for talking about food and giving us a demo. NEVER APOLOGIZE. We all want to know how and what you moms feed yourselves. (Lookin’ at you, Sarah Hart)

When I got to Trader Joe’s yesterday and spotted the orzo I got all *praise hands emoji* and super-inspired.

And thus was this recipe was born. It’s currently in the running for my husband’s favorite dinner.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. spoicy* Italian sausage (all I had was pre-cooked, so I diced it up. I would have much preferred raw spicy Italian sausage, so that’s how I’m writing this recipe.)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 medium zucchini (all you people who grow your own zucchini, medium does NOT mean the size of your entire arm, even though I know that’s your medium-sized zucchini)
  • 2 C raw spinach (can you tell I’m desperately trying to add more veg into my recipes?)
  • 1 ½ C chopped artichoke hearts (if you don’t like these as much as I do, you can pare it down, but DON’T.)
  • Juice of 1 lemon (a real lemon, not the juice in the bottle, y’all.)
  • 3 C cooked orzo (save some of the pasta water!)
  • 1 C grated fresh parmagiano

*spoicy was a typo we accidentally used once in college and I just like it better than the original. Say it out loud. You won’t regret it.

Add the raw Italian sausage to a heated pan and cook it halfway. Make sure your pan is large enough so the meal has room to grow. A sauté pan with tall sides would be ideal, but since we live in an Airbnb, I used an extra-big frying pan that was in our kitchen. At halfway, the sausage should still be pink with a little bit of browning. At this point add the chopped zucchini and a generous salting. Cook until the sausage is completely cooked and the zucchini is tender.

Add the spinach and cover the pan until it’s wilted. If you don’t have a pan with a lid, use the line cook’s trick and cover it with a cookie sheet. Add a little water if it needs more steam in there. This will also help cook the zucchini.

Stir in the chopped artichoke hearts. This adds that delightful acidity that recipes like this always need. Squeeze in half the lemon juice.

Add cooked orzo. NB: DO NOT over-cook the orzo, otherwise this ends up being a tasteless mush of gluten glue and no one likes that.

Add fresh parmigiano and a little of the pasta water that you saved because you’re a Nice Person who knows how Pasta likes to be treated. Stir. Squeeze the rest of the lemon juice over it. Voila!

Serves: 2-ish

Next time I make this, I’d like to add some roasted cherry tomatoes and a little feta. I’ll add a note to the bottom of this post if I like it.

Egészségedre!

Hannah